The Best Managers Expect Change Then Embrace It

Change is inevitable. It can be driven by internal factors such as a merger or an acquisition to grow the business. Or, it can begin with the resignation of a key leader, or the hiring of someone new to the organization. Change can also be driven by external factors such as the addition of a new product, a new regulation requirement. Or, it can begin with the introduction of another competitor to the market.

Because we all know change is inevitable, managers can drive future success in their departments by fostering a positive attitude toward change. 

How?

By being fully aware of the need for the change and the direction the organization is headed.

  • An aware manager can better articulate to employees where the company is now and where leadership sees it in the future. 
  • Managers should also be able to articulate why the company needs to change, relative to things like shifting market forces, new opportunities, financial issues, or a new strategic approach.

By anticipating it and purposefully planning for change. 

  • Employees work better with concrete, achievable goals.
  • A manager can help employees see the roles they play in achieving the new goals and what it will mean for them, their coworkers, their unit, and the organization once the goals are achieved.

By eliminating fear of change. Address change in an intentional, goal-oriented manner. 

  • A manager should recognize and describe change as something that people should do, not something that is done to them.
  • Encourage risk taking and opinion sharing. The most important thing to help employees adapt to change is to create trust. One way this can be accomplished is by creating an environment in which people will not face consequences for trying something new and questioning established processes.

By encouraging inclusion in the process. A manager will make employees more comfortable with change when they invite them to participate in planning for or implementing it because they gain some sense of control which reduces their fears.

  • Hold all hands meetings where you allow employees to submit questions and receive answers from senior level leaders.
  • Adopt a continuous feedback tool where employees can give feedback directly to leaders directly involved in the implementation of a change.
     

Blog written by:

Tina Garner, PHR, SHRM-CP

Human Resources Director, RideNow Powersports

How To Handle Difficult Employees

Every employer will have to deal with a difficult employee eventually. Sometimes, a serious conversation is all that’s needed to solve the problem. At other times, you might need to bring in HR. Here are seven types of troublesome employees and what you can do to handle the issues they bring.

The LOAFER: Known for goofing off, the loafer does just enough work to get by, while other employees have to pick up the slack. Unsurprisingly, this can cause resentment. Have a candid conversation, telling the loafer to focus on doing their job, not on wasting time. And reward those who pick up the slack.

The MALCONTENT: The grump in the group, the malcontent can squelch other’s ideas and lower morale with just a few words. Talk with them to discover the cause of their discontent and encourage them to offer potential solutions alongside any complaints they raise.

The MEDDLER: Extremely nosy, the meddler is known to ask personal or rude questions. Worse yet, they’re quick to share what they’ve learned. If your goal is a harmonious workplace, have the difficult conversation. Tell the meddler to focus on their work, not other people’s business.

The NARCISSIST: Desperate to be the center of attention, the narcissist puts their ego above the needs of the company. Assign them to projects where their strengths and skills will shine, while encouraging them to give credit to their hardworking coworkers.

The THIEF: Shady and manipulative, the thief lies and maybe even steals from your company. This makes other employees uneasy and scared. Don’t let your guard down when dealing with the thief. Instead, investigate discreetly. If you have hard evidence they’ve stolen from you, seek legal advice before confronting them.

The VICTIM: Excuses, excuses. With the victim, it’s always someone else’s fault. Counter this behavior by explaining it’s not about assigning blame. You don’t expect perfection, but you do expect people to help solve problems when they arise, not point a finger.

The YELLER: From shrieking laughter to loud chatter, the yeller can distract and annoy others. Sure, they may not realize how disruptive they are, but people need to get work done. Be direct and tactful when you tell them to lower their volume. After all, what you’re asking is reasonable.

You Can’t Wear That! Dealing With An Employee Who Dresses Inappropriately

If you’re a small business owner with staff, at some point you’re going to have to deal with a sticky, employee-related situation. Whether it’s an employee who’s always out sick, staff who look for sneaky ways to abuse benefit privileges or team members being careless on social media, your people may make choices that don’t suit your business—including what they wear to work.

It’s a situation no business owner wants to face, but you and your employees may not be on the same page when it comes to appropriate work attire. As workplace dress codes continue to get more casual across the country, business owners and their staff may struggle to determine what’s acceptable to wear at work and why.

Use these tips to determine how to communicate with staff when an employee dresses inappropriately.

1. Have an answer for ‘Why Can’t I Wear This?’

It’s important that all members of your staff understand why certain clothing items or styles aren’t acceptable in your workplace, and that sometimes it’s about more than just making a good impression. For instance, if you work in an environment with machinery, tools, heavy equipment or other potential dangers, inappropriate clothing may not adequately protect  your workers. Even worse, some clothing, such as wide, loose sleeves, may interfere with equipment and pose a safety hazard.

2. Send out reminders when necessary.

Sometimes, the best way to deal with a minor “wardrobe infraction” is to post a reminder list on the wall in the break room or send out a simple company-wide email reminding your staff of the expected dress code. This subtle reminder may be all that’s required to get the attention of the specific offender, plus any others who may be tempted to stray toward inappropriate clothing choices for work. If this doesn’t work, though, prepare to talk to the staff member in question.

3. Be really specific about acceptable work clothing.

When communicating to your employee about what is and isn’t acceptable attire, be as specific as possible. Explain that what they’re wearing isn’t safe while working at a lathe, for example. Also prepare to clearly explain what’s included in any terminology you use. Instead of saying that your employee should avoid “casual wear,” specify that they should avoid “weekend casual wear” and list the clothing items that are included in this category.

For example, your non-acceptable “weekend” casual wear list could include:

  • Athletic shoes
  • Flip-flops
  • Sweatpants or yoga pants
  • Hats
  • Hoodies and sweatshirts
  • Halter tops
  • Crop-tops (belly-baring shirts)
  • Jeans

And your acceptable “business casual” list could include:

  • Khakis
  • Cotton trousers
  • Skirts
  • Blouses
  • Polo shirts
  • Pullover sweaters
  • Cardigans

The key is to clearly communicate to all your staff what is and isn’t acceptable work attire.

4. Understand the do’s and don’ts for talking about inappropriate clothing.

Before you talk to your employee about his or her clothing choices, review this list of what to do and what to avoid.

Do

  • Make the conversation easier by preparing. Make sure you are well-versed on your company dress code, and more importantly, that your dress code is legally compliant.
  • Choose a private setting to talk to the staff member, so you can address the issue without embarrassing them in front of others.
  • Choose your words carefully. For example, “I’ve noticed your clothing choices, which, though they may be appropriate outside of our office/shop/business, are not in keeping with our dress code. I’d appreciate your cooperation in making some minor changes.”
  • Introduce your meeting as a time clarify your dress code and make sure your employee understands it.
  • Be specific about the problem. For example, “The shoes you’re wearing expose your toes, so they don’t meet the safety requirement of closed-toe shoes in our dress code.”

Don’t

  • Attend alone, especially when speaking with an opposite-sex employee. Bring in another staff member.
  • Make it a personal attack on the  person’s character. This is about the clothing they wear at work, not an attack on their lifestyle, religion or political choices.
  • Use the word “improve.” If you do, it may sound like you’re dealing with a performance issue.

5. Have “The Talk” with your employee.

If an employee wears something inappropriate after you’ve sent out a group email, it’s time to talk specifically to them. Keep in mind the information from tips three and four, and act quickly.

“Don’t delay taking action—even if just verbally and even if you learn of the infraction long after it occurs,” says human resources consultant Linda Michaels. Clearly point out any dress code violations plus how to remedy them.

Discussions about acceptable workplace clothing can be uncomfortable. They require a sensitive and delicate approach. To keep inappropriate clothing at work from becoming an extended issue, the best strategies are to head it off before it even starts and address any wardrobe infractions immediately.

Does your business struggle to provide incentives to millennials, Gen Zers?
  • Employers say they’re struggling to attract and retain millennial and Gen Z workers, in part because they can’t provide the incentives they believe these demographics want. More than 1,000 senior-level HR professionals responded to a survey by Allegis on the state of millennials and Gen Z in the workforce, and almost half voiced this concern. Most say they believe this failure will negatively impact their company by slowing growth, reducing productivity and increasing hiring costs.
  • What’s keeping them from enticing these generations into the fold? More than 70% believe outmoded work practices, sketchy career paths and limits on advancement, development and mentoring are impacting attrition. Flexible work schedules, wellness programs, fast-track promotions and other perks were identified by 69% of respondents as problematic.
  • Millennials, the study suggests, are looking for more than salary and benefits; diversity and inclusion rank high on their employment wishlist, as does strong corporate social responsibility (CSR). Yet only 12% of businesses believe their D&I programs help attract talent, and only 13% believe CSR does.

AZ HR Hub Insight:

Millennials, the generation that will dominate the workforce at an estimated 75% representation by 2025, comprise 35% of workers in the U.S. today. To attract and retain this demographic, employers may have to do some serious surveying and listening.

Priorities may vary from workplace to workplace, and generational stereotypes can create problems. PwC, for example, saw that its millennials were clamoring for flexibility and leaving when they didn’t get it. It conducted a survey and, naturally, found that “millennials want more flexibility, the opportunity to shift hours — to start their work days later, for example, or put in time at night, if necessary. But so do non-millennials, in equal numbers.”

Allegis’ findings about diversity and CSR may well apply to other generations as well. Studies have found that diverse teams are more innovative, and employer branding — including a persona as a good corporate citizen — can go a long way with employees of all generations.

4 Hiring Challenges Facing Small Business Owners

Hiring professional talent in today’s market can be extremely difficult. Find out why it can be so tough for companies, while also learning how to deal with the stress of finding the right candidates.

For many small business owners, the last few years have been the best of times. As the economy has grown, their businesses have grown. New clients have appeared, and existing clients have increased orders. Growth is exciting.

As companies grow, however, they often need to hire new people for positions that did not previously exist. Suddenly, a function needs to be professionalized. Ten years ago a company could promote a warehouse worker to a shipping supervisor role, but after years of expansion, the business needs a supply chain manager to handle the more complex relationships that stem from a growing company. A decade ago, an office manager could double as a personnel manager at a 25-employee company. With 120 staff members today, that same firm needs at least a professional HR manager, if not a director.

Unless properly managed, these hiring projects could lead to the worst of times. For a business owner, hiring professional talent in today’s market can be problematic. Here are a few reasons why hiring can cause a headache for small businesses, and how to help your business stand out in the hiring process.

It’s a tight market

With a 4 percent unemployment rate, there is a limited pool of unemployed job candidates. Your ideal hire might be working somewhere else and needs a reason to quit their job and work for you. When a promising talent is not looking for work, they need to be identified and attracted to your company.

Employers have built stronger cultures

Since the last recession, most companies, large and small, have improved their culture and business. In 2008, a candidate might have been eager to escape a horrible boss or bad culture. Thankfully, there are fewer of both now, but relying on another company to be worse than yours is a bad strategy.

The skills you want reside in larger firms

In the past, small companies could attract talent from larger firms by emphasizing work flexibility and a family atmosphere. Over the years, most large companies have invested a fortune in work-life balance alternatives, as well as other bells and whistles. Don’t expect a candidate to take a pay cut to work at a smaller firm just because you won’t make them use a vacation day for a child’s doctor visit. Realistically, is that worth $10,000 less in salary and a cut in a 401(k) match?

Candidates have options

The traditional mindset is that a candidate applies for a job – basically asking an employer to consider them. In reality, the balance of power has now shifted. Employers ask the candidate to join them. Many small companies let their egos get in the way of this newfound practice. They think the candidate needs to show they want the job and make some type of sacrifice. This is a self-defeating philosophy, especially when a candidate is considering multiple employers. The choice is not between a candidate’s existing employer and your company. It is between the existing employer and any of two, three or five companies that will appear over the next few months. In a good economy, everyone grows. Other companies have grown and need the same skilled candidates as you.

The solution

The first thing you need to do is create a clear message for attracting talented candidates. If your team can’t answer the question, “Why should I quit my job and work for you?” then you need to revisit your message and, potentially, your team members. The answer can’t be “because we are nice people.” It needs to be a clearly defined message.

The second step is determining the type of person you want to hire. Attributes like experience level, current job and the type of company or industry someone is currently working in should all be analyzed and considered. Select and define the factors most important to your business. Identify your market, and then figure out a way to get that message to your market. Ads, recruitment firms and aggressive referral programs are all useful tools.

Lastly, have an employment process that is candidate friendly. Don’t make a candidate leave work in the middle of the day for a half-hour screening interview. Don’t have an interviewer who thinks it is their job to ask questions but not answer them. Engage with the candidate. If you don’t do that with them now, they will project that behavior onto themselves as a potential employee and stop the hiring process before it ever really gets started.

How to Create a Talent Management Process

If you want to get the best out of your employees and attract new talent, you must implement an efficient talent management process.

Employees are the most important part of an organization, offering passion, personality, hard work and unique assets from all angles. This is the mentality you should have when developing your team – and your talent management process.

Some employers act on the notion that workers can be replaced, viewing them not as humans but as machines that simply get the job done. Instead, you should recognize and build on superior talent within your organization, focusing on their personal strengths and interests, and how they fit into your business.

Such a strategy is known as a talent management process, which seeks to recruit, develop and retain top talent.

Today’s employees want to know that they have been selected for positions because they have the ability to succeed in those positions and that the organization is going to continue to develop them into top performers. They are looking for companies with strong talent management systems that will recognize their individual efforts, reward their performance, and give them opportunities for growth and development.

Your talent management process exists to support your employees without trying to change them. It’s a crucial addition to every business. To get the best out of your employees and continue to attract new talent, you’ll want to implement an efficient talent management process. Here’s how.

Creating a talent management process

The first step is to ensure that there are channels and pathways for expectation setting, training, two-way feedback, and coaching to enable a continuous cycle of talent management and performance.

Transparency is key. Employees search for more than monetary rewards and a glamorous office. Sure, those incentives are attractive and beneficial, but workers want to know that they share the vision and values of their potential company. That’s why it’s crucial to identify your organization’s mission from the get-go.

The organization must have a solid idea of what they are about, what they want to accomplish and who they want to be as they journey there. This may take the form of a mission statement, organization goal and/or a list of no-compromise values.

Given how tight the labor market is today, it’s critical that you’re able to differentiate the experience your company or team will provide for a potential candidate and, eventually, employee. Part of how this is accomplished is by sharing company values and telling their story – things that must be proved out once someone is hired. It can’t just be lip service.

Your vision and values as a company will influence every part of your talent management process, from recruitment and hiring to retention and employee development. For instance, an applicant might be a talented individual with tons of experience, but if their objectives don’t match yours, they won’t serve your organization the way you need. Or, if a current employee isn’t progressing in a way that suits your mission, you’ll better know how to approach the issue for both parties.

Areas of focus

There are many issues to address in your talent management process:

  • Organizational and job design: Which skills, abilities and performance are needed to meet goals and objectives?
  • Workforce planning: What is your strategy or plan for developing teams with the necessary skills and capabilities? Which skills are critical to hire, and which can be built through training and coaching?
  • Talent acquisition: How will you source, screen and hire talent with the right skills, abilities and characteristics?
  • Onboarding and orientation: What are your pre-arrival and arrival logistics? What will your new-hire orientation entail? How will you ensure effective expectation setting, team integration, and cultural alignment and assimilation?
  • Learning and development: How will you customize training for each worker in line with company goals and objectives? How will you integrate this development into day-to-day performance, management, feedback and coaching?
  • Performance management: How will you provide continuous opportunities for performance review, appraisal, feedback and planning? How will you ensure clarity of expectations and nurture a culture of coaching and performance?
  • Leadership development: How will you review employee performance and potential? How will you develop and prepare individuals for possible leadership roles?
  • Employee engagement: How will you continuously gauge employee engagement levels? How will you align their work with the company’s vision, objectives, beliefs, roles and values?

As a small business looking to make initial inroads around effective talent management, it is important to focus on the components and levers that are most impactful for your team or organization.

 

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