How Seniors Can Choose the Best Part-Time Job When You’re Ready to Reenter the Workforce
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Did you spend years dreaming of retirement… only to get there and realize you miss having a job? For previous generations, retirement was considered the end of your working years, but today’s seniors are redefining what it means to live life to the fullest in retirement. In some cases, the need to earn extra money drives retirees to work, while for others, it’s the desire to find a meaningful pursuit or meet other people. Whatever it is that’s driving you to look for work, start your search by asking yourself these questions, provided courtesy of HR Consulting Services. There are limitless opportunities out there (you can even create your own!).

Where do you want to work?

We don’t mean where in terms of specific jobs, but instead, ask yourself the type of work setting you want. Do you want to be in an office that’s fast-paced and exciting, or maybe somewhere low-key and chill? Maybe you love art and would enjoy working in a local museum, or if you love the outdoors, spending your time as a trail guide might be fun. 

On the other hand, you may be ready to spend some time at home after years of going into work. When you first started your career, working from home wasn’t nearly as popular or as feasible as it is today. Now you can find remote work opportunities in all kinds of fields, whether you want a role that was traditionally office-bound, such as sales, marketing, or customer service, or you want to branch out on your own in a freelance role like writing. Most remote positions offer flexible hours, and you get to do something you enjoy from the comfort of home. Best of all, these jobs are easy to find with online job boards, plus most of these search sites also have their own app that you can use from a mobile device.

How important is pay?

Wanting to be compensated fairly for your time is a given, but it’s a simple fact that some jobs pay better than others. The question is – how much weight do you give to the pay compared to other factors like how enjoyable and rewarding a job is? If you’re looking for work because your budget is tight, finding a job that offers higher pay may be a top priority. However, you may be ready for a job that’s less demanding or that involves service, which may not pay as well as other opportunities. 

Pay certainly isn’t the only factor involved, but it’s worth knowing what to expect when you start your job search. Some of the best-paying jobs for seniors are often found in professional arenas, such as being an adjunct professor or a consultant in your field. If you have something else in mind, check out AARP’s top jobs for retirees, which are broken down by average salary.

What skills can you offer?

If you aren’t sure where to start with your job search, think about the skills you have from your career – or even skills you gained while raising children or volunteering. You can often turn those skills into an opportunity that’s similar to your previous job but that’s also more flexible. For example, someone who is good with numbers could become a bookkeeper or tax preparer. If you retired from education, you could be a tutor or a substitute teacher. 

Are you willing to learn a new skill?

Relying on the skills you have is an obvious choice, but what if you want to give something different a try? If you’re willing to learn new skills, there’s no time like the present to start gaining the knowledge you need for a second career. You can boost your skills with continuing education courses, online classes, and certification programs. Many community colleges and public libraries also offer coursework and classes that will help you prepare for a new job.

Do you want to travel?

If you dream of spending retirement as a jet-setter, there’s no better way to fund your travels than to find travel-related work. One option is to use the talents you already have while looking for opportunities abroad. For example, if you have experience working with children, you can find jobs in other countries as a nanny or teaching English as a second language.

Another option is to get into the travel industry. These opportunities can include everything from traditional jobs, such as being a travel agent, to more creative roles like becoming a travel blogger. Many seniors also get jobs working for cruise lines, resorts, or campgrounds. If there’s a locale where you would love to be, chances are there’s an opportunity to live and work there.

Is starting your own business the right move?

More and more retirees are enjoying the benefits of launching their own small businesses. And the perks are pretty compelling. You get to set your schedule, be your own boss, use skills you’ve built up, and do something you really enjoy. There are definitely a lot of pros to starting a business, but there are also some drawbacks. 

You’ll need to have a worthwhile service or product that customers want that can pay the bills. You’ll also need to create a solid business plan, and prepare for potentially high startup costs, as well as steel yourself for long days. This is only the tip of the iceberg. There’s also a possible learning curve that can elicit all kinds of questions like “What is payroll?”, “Do I need an accountant?”, “What type of compliance laws do I need to understand?” It’s a lot. However, if you have the means and the energy, this could be a great way to generate income in retirement. 

The bottom line is that, whatever you choose, this next job should be one you’re excited to go to. That may mean working from your home office… or traveling halfway around the world. The choice is yours – and the options are endless.

Written by guest blogger, Sharon Wagner

HR Management Trends Continue

Business trends come and go, but they impact our daily work lives. When it comes to HR management, evolving technology and a shift in workforce needs will continue to shape the trends. 

As small business seek ways to operate more effectively, let’s examine four of the key trends the human capital management experts say will continue.

1. Flexible work schedules on the rise

“Flexible work arrangements” is a term you’ll continue to hear. One reason: Millennials now make up the largest generational share of the workforce, and work-life flexibility is a priority for this demographic.

More than half — 52% — of HR professionals say their companies currently offer flexible work arrangements to at least some employees, according to a Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) survey. Even more interesting, SHRM members reported that retention improved when companies simply announced they were launching flexible work arrangements — that’s how much workers want this.

Some experts predict that employers who offer flexible work schedules will see gains in recruitment and morale, as well as a reduction in turnover.

Of course, not all companies are in a position to offer flexible work schedules. But for companies managing aggressive recruiting and retention goals, it’s certainly food for thought.

2. A growing remote workforce

Eighty to ninety percent of the American workforce would like to work remotely at least part time, according to a study by Global Workplace Analytics. No wonder telecommuting has increased by 115% in the last decade!

Employees who telecommute report higher morale, lower absenteeism and greater willingness to work overtime. It’s good for the environment, too — no commuting.

And contrary to what you might think, multiple studies indicate that remote workers demonstrate greater productivity, while saving employers on office space. (For example, American Express reports saving $10 to $15 million per year in real estate costs because of its telecommuting program.)

However, many executives remain uncomfortable with the idea, and not all jobs or industries lend themselves to telecommuting. But the demand isn’t likely to go away. If talent acquisition is key to your company’s growth strategy, offering a remote work option — even part-time — could be a smart move.

3. Social recruiting on the move 

Eighty-five percent of companies use social media as a recruiting vehicle. It’s so pervasive, it even has its own name now: social recruiting. While LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook remain the big three, where will it go from here?

We will see more companies leverage mobile recruiting platforms. According to Pew Research Center, 28% of all Americans (and 53% of 18 to 29-year-olds) use their smartphones for job hunting. Half of them have completed a job application using their phones. If your company’s hiring platform isn’t mobile friendly, you’re missing out.

In addition, employers may be turning to professional/association social networking sites to recruit this year. It’s a more targeted way to hone in on experienced applicants and reach passive job candidates. Why not give it a try?

4. Using technology for HR program management

We continue to see vast advances in HR technology in every area, from time and attendance systems and benefits administration to recruiting and performance management programs.

According to Sierra-Cedar’s 2017-2018 HR Systems Survey, 50% of companies have purchased a cloud-based HR application. The migration to the cloud continues.

In addition, you can expect to hear about:

  • The adoption of continuous performance management systems. For years, employers have been moving away from an annual review process and toward an ongoing performance management process. Look for human capital management systems that actively support such year-round activities.
  • Using granular analytics to refine HR processes. While companies have been demanding HR analytics for a while, many organizations are still figuring out how to best put them to use. From recruiting metrics that allow employers to shorten the hiring process to time and attendance data that pinpoints field management issues, employers will dig in to HR analytics in increasingly meaningful ways.
  • Increased use of mobile time tracking apps. According to the Sierra-Cedar study, there’s been a 50% increase in mobile time tracking over last year. This tracks with the other trends discussed above. Employees are using their phone for more job-related activities. Employers are becoming more flexible in terms of where and when employees work. It only makes sense that HR systems like time and attendance software are able to follow along.

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