2018 Compensation and Benefits Workshop

We are excited to host a half day workshop on October 3rd at Because Space for Life.

When employees feel satisfied and valued in their roles, they’ll be more engaged and motivated to work harder and deliver top results.

At the 2018 Comp & Benefits Workshop, HR thought leaders and experts will touch on aspects of Total Rewards – from compensation, to work-life effectiveness and benefits, including pay equity and paid time off. You’ll walk away with practical tips and new strategies to ultimately create breakthrough performance throughout your company.

Agenda

 7:30 – 8:15am Continental Breakfast, Registration, Network, Meet Vendors
 8:15 – 8:30am Welcome message
 8:30 – 10:00am How to Become a Compensation Nerd

 

Does compensation mystify you?  Well, you’re not alone.  Join your fellow generalists on a journey to understand compensation basics and some strategic approaches to forming your company’s pay practices. In this workshop you will learn:

·       The eight questions to answer before you start solving your compensation issues.

·       How to think about and use survey data

·       How to structure your base pay into grades and ranges

10:00 – 10:15am Break with Vendors
10:15 – 11:45am Winning at Total Rewards: How to HIGH FIVE your Total Rewards program!

 

A 90-minute tour of the FIVE Total Rewards components that will make your TR program successful.  In this workshop you will learn:

·       Review the foundation of Total Rewards and the FIVE key components that make up a great TR program

·       For each of the FIVE key components, a quick look at best practices and how to set up that part of your TR plan if you don’t already have it

·       Resources to help assist in the setup and maintenance of the FIVE key components

11:45 – 12:00pm Wrap Up, Raffle Prizes


Why Attend?

  • Evaluate your organization’s existing total rewards strategy using current trend information.
  • Discover new strategies to build a “Best Place to Work” culture that attracts and retains the best and brightest talent.
  • Determine how to influence your organization’s success by learning real-world and practical solutions to your top business and HR challenges.
  • Understand why engaging employees is the path to profitability and business growth and how to use employee engagement as the ultimate competitive advantage.
  • Develop an impactful total rewards strategy with help from peer insights and analytics and learn how to communicate your offerings, so employees understand the value.
  • Network with more than 150 HR professionals who are responsible for compensation and benefits plans and strategies.

 Meet Our Speakers

Gail Paul is the CEO of StrategiComp.  She has over 25 years of experience as both consultant and practitioner in the areas of compensation, executive compensation and benefits.

StrategiComp, formed in 2016, has many diverse publicly and privately funded clients from multiple industries.

Gail’s background includes serving as the top Total Rewards executive for publicly traded organizations Universal Technical Institute and Del Webb Corporation (Pulte Homes), where she was responsible for managing executive compensation programs, pay and incentive structures, equity incentive plans, and creating and communicating the compensation philosophy and strategies.

Gail has also worked as a Senior Consultant at Mercer H.R. Consulting / Mercer Health & Benefits, providing comprehensive HR and benefits consultation to large corporate and government clients in Arizona and Nevada. She was the founder and principle of Matrix Compensation & Benefits Consulting, where she crafted powerful compensation and total rewards strategies for a wide variety of clients, public, private, Fortune 500 and small firms.

Gail is a Certified Executive Compensation Professional through WorldatWork and is an active member.  In addition, Gail is a Predictive Index Certified Partner through MindWire Group where she serves as Vice President/Partner.

 

Sheila Krueger is a Total Rewards Expert with Televerde. Sheila M Krueger is what is referred to as a “seasoned” professional. Not only is she tender and juicy, she’s got over 20 years of practical and strategic experience in the Total Rewards arena. Starting with a stint selecting and installing an HRIS system (when she didn’t even know what HRIS stood for), to overseeing Total Rewards programs for companies of 200, 750, and 3500 employees, Sheila has heard all the stories and survived to tell the tales.

 

Meet Our Vendors

Edward Jones – Carina Burtell

HRCI Credits Pending

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Why should you improve your employee onboarding program?

Employee onboarding is a very method used in talent acquisition.
If done right, employee onboarding process can easily become your secret weapon for hiring and retaining talent.

A successful employee onboarding program ensures that your best candidate actually shows up on their first day at the new job.

This is because a successful employee onboarding process starts at the moment your best candidate accepts your offer.
If you don’t engage you best candidates until their start date, they might accept a better offer or a counteroffer from their current employer.

It also helps to improve retention, engagement, satisfaction, and productivity of your new employees.

According to the Society For Human Resources Management (SHRM):

  • 69% of employees are more likely to stay with a company for three years if they experienced great onboarding.
  • Organizations with a standard onboarding process experience 50% greater new-hire productivity.
  • 54% of companies with onboarding programs reported higher employee engagement.

3 best employee onboarding tips

Here are the best 3 tips that will help get the most out of your onboarding program:

Tip #1: Plan and organize 

If you want to maximize the power of your onboarding process, you need to carefully structure it. To learn how, check out our step-by-step Guide on how to successfully onboard new employees.

Keep in mind that:

  1. A successful onboarding is a process
    A successful employee onboarding is not an event that takes place on your new employee’s first day at the office. It is a continuous process that starts at the moment your best candidate accepts your job offer.
  2. A successful onboarding is people oriented
    A successful employee onboarding is not focused on tasks, but on people.
    The human touch drives onboarding success.  The secret of great onboarding is the fact that it makes your new employees feel welcomed and integrated into your company culture from the day one!

Tip #2: Automate 

Automating your employee onboarding process will help you save time and your nerves. There are many different employee onboarding tools you can use to easily automate your onboarding process.

There are 3 main types of employee onboarding tools:

  1. Checklists: Checklists are the most simple and straightforward tool that can help you onboard new employees.
  2. Specialized tools: Specialized employee onboarding tools are tools created for the sole purpose of improving the employee onboarding process.
  3. Integrated tools: Integrated tools are comprehensive, all-in-one tools that offer solutions for your whole HR management process, including payroll, benefits, time and attendance, etc.

Tip#3: Be creative 

To make your new employees’ onboarding experience truly unique, you need to get creative! Luckily for you, we compiled the best and the most innovative employee onboarding ideas and examples from experts to inspire you!

Here are 3 simple, but creative employee onboarding ideas you can easily implement:

  1. Welcome GIF or video: Gather your team and create a welcome video for your new employee!
    If your employees shy away from a camera or you don’t have enough time on your hands, go with the quicker version – create a welcome GIF!
  2. Decorate your new employee’s desk: Decorate your new employee’s desk with some balloons, welcome sign and maybe even some cake! You can also pack your company swag (such as branded notebook, pens, T-shirt, water bottle, etc.) as a present!
  3. 100th-day party: Throwing a 100 day on the job party for your employees is a great opportunity to shower them with some attention and remind them how much you are happy to have them joined your company.
Top 10 Don’ts When You Fire an Employee

Firing an employee is stressful for all parties—not just for the employee losing a job. No matter how well you’ve communicated about performance problems with the employee, almost no one believes that they will actually get fired. With cause, too. The average employer waits too long to fire a non-performing employee much of the time.

So, employees convince themselves that they won’t get fired: they think that you like them; they think that you know that they are a nice person, or you recognize that they’ve been trying hard. In fact, you may believe and think all of these things. But, none of your feelings matter when the employee is not performing his job.

Firing an employee may take you awhile—usually much longer than the circumstances merit. Because you are kind, caring, and tend to give employees another chance. But, these are the top 10 things you do not want to do when you do decide to fire an employee.

Don’t Fire an Employee Unless You Are Meeting Face-to-Face

169270617.jpg

Do not fire an employee using any electronic method—no emails, IMs, voicemails, or phone calls. Even a letter is inappropriate when you fire an employee.

When you fire an employee give them the courtesy that you would extend to any human being. They deserve a face-to-face meeting when you fire an employee. Nothing else works.

The fired employee will remember and your other employees who remain have even longer memories. And, no, during this time of social media dominance, don’t believe for a minute that the circumstances of the firing will remain secret.

You will have created a scenario in which your remaining employees are afraid to trust you. Or worse, they trust that you may harm them, too.

Don’t Fire an Employee Without Warning

104823912.jpg

Nothing makes an employee angrier than feeling blindsided when fired. Unless an immediate, egregious act occurs, the employee should experience coaching and performance feedback over time. Before you fire an employee, try to determine what is causing the employee to fail.

If you decide the employee is able to improve her performance, provide whatever assistance is needed to encourage and support the employee. Document each step in the improvement process so that the employee has a record of what is happening at each step. The employer is also protecting its own interests in the event of a lawsuit over the termination.

If you are confident that the employee can improve, and the employee’s role allows, a performance improvement plan (PIP) may show the employee specific, measurable improvement requirements. (A PIP is difficult, if not impossible, with a manager or HR staff, once you have lost confidence in their performance.)

Do not, however, use a PIP unless you are confident that the employee can improve. The agonizing process of meeting weekly to chart no progress is horrible for the employee, the manager, and the HR rep, too.

The actual termination—while almost always somewhat of a surprise—should not come with no warning.

Don’t Fire an Employee Without a Witness

157859735.jpg

Especially in the US, anyone can sue anybody, at any time, for any reason. In employment termination cases, the employee has to find a lawyer who believes he can win the case and thus, collect his fee. The best practice is to include a second employee in the meeting when you fire an employee.

This gives you an individual who hears and participates in the employment termination in addition to the manager. This person can also help pick up the slack if the hiring manager runs out of words or is unsure of what to say or do next.

This witness is often the Human Resources staff person. The HR person has more experience than the average manager, in firing employees, so can also help keep the discussion on track and moving to completion.

The HR person can also ensure that employees are treated fairly, equally, and with professionalism across departments and individual managers. This limits your liability when you fire an employee.

Don’t Supply Lengthy Rationale and Examples for Why You Are Firing the Employee

313567-021.jpg

If you have coached and documented an employee’s performance over time and provided frequent feedback, there is no point in rehashing your dissatisfaction when you fire the employee. It accomplishes nothing and is cruel.

Yet, every employee will ask you why. So, have an answer prepared that is honest and correctly summarizes the situation without detail or placing blame.

You want the employee to maintain her dignity during an employment termination. So, you might say, “We’ve already discussed your performance issues. We are terminating your employment because your performance does not meet the standards we expect from this position.

“We wish you well in your future endeavors and trust that you will locate a position that is a better fit for you. You have many talents and we are confident that you will locate a position that can take advantage of them.”

Or you can simply remind the employee that you have discussed issues with him or her over time, and leave it at that.

The more detailed you become, the less able you will be to use any of the information you discover following the employment termination in a subsequent lawsuit. And, as an employer, you will always find out additional information.

For example, think about a terminated HR staff person who had months of new employee paperwork in her drawer. The employees had not been enrolled in healthcare insurance.

In another example, a marketing employee had the entire bookkeeping for her bar which she operated in the evenings on her company-owned computer. (The employer was kind and gave her a copy of her bookkeeping which they didn’t need to do.)

Did you know that 85% of resumes contain lies?

It’s not surprising some job applicants feel the need to embellish their resumes to get a better shot at a job. But the exact number — now 85% — has risen dramatically over the past few years. 

Resume lies have become so common that a lot of dishonest applicants are going undetected. Whether this is due to increasing pressure to fill positions quickly or trusting HR pros, a survey by SimplyHired discovered that 46% of hiring managers fail to check references, and 65% don’t verify a candidate’s education.

Even more shockingly, 16% of those surveyed don’t have time to read the whole resume, and 34% just skim over the cover letter.

This means there’s a pretty good chance a lot of applicants have gotten away with a lie, so they’re going to keep trying.

Why candidates really lie

While any lie seems devious, it’s a misconception that every resume exaggerator is trying to con their way into a job they aren’t qualified for. Some candidates are resorting to fudging the truth out of frustration, and not necessarily intentional deception.

More and more applicants are aware that companies use screening software to automatically eliminate resumes that don’t contain certain keywords or don’t meet minimum requirements. This often results in candidates never hearing back about a position and not getting a real shot at a job.

To prevent themselves from being weeded out right from the get-go, candidates will tweak their resumes to better fit a position by including as many keywords or requirements as they can.

Tammy Cohen, founder of InfoMart, a company that specializes in screening job candidates, thinks some companies’ job descriptions can be the cause of applicants’ embellishments. Unsurprisingly, job postings are often written in a creative, eye-catching way to attract more applicants. To match this style, candidates often jazz up their own resumes to appear to be a good fit for the position.

While small exaggerations can be relatively harmless, some candidates blatantly lie about crucial aspects of the resume.

Here are the top things job seekers lie about, according to a survey by OfficeTeam:

  • job experience (76%)
  • job duties (55%)
  • education (33%), and
  • employment dates (26%).

What to look for

Obviously, big lies in these areas are ones HR pros definitely want to catch. And OfficeTeam has compiled a list of several red flags that can be indicators of dishonesty, along with how hiring managers can find out the truth.

  1. Their skills have vague descriptions. When a candidate is trying to stretch out their list of skills, they may start listing items with phrases like “familiar with” or “involved with.” If someone is “familiar with HTML,” that could mean they took one class in high school and can barely remember anything. If a candidate was “involved with compiling sales reports,” they very well could’ve watched as others on their team did the heavy lifting. Also, watch out for any duties or titles that don’t really make sense — does it seem like a candidate is using more creative words to describe simple tasks?
    The Fix: To make sure candidates have the concrete skills they claim, skills tests can be used as part of the hiring process. To get an even better idea if their skills are up to snuff, you can give the candidate a job audition or hire them on a temporary basis.
  2. Their employment dates are questionable or missing. When a candidate has previous job dates listed by the year instead of month, it can be an attempt to lengthen stints and hide periods of unemployment.
    The Fix: Directly asking candidates what the months of their employment were can help clear this up if they answer truthfully. This can also give them a chance to explain any long gaps in their resumes, too. But if you still sense an applicant isn’t being honest with you, calling references to confirm employment dates is crucial.
  3. Their body language is off during the interview. If a candidate isn’t making eye contact or keeps fidgeting in their chair, this could be an indication of dishonesty. Be careful with this one, though. These could simply be signs of an anxious applicant, not an untruthful one.
    The Fix: If the person is particularly fidgety while discussing a certain part of their resume, keep asking about it. If they can’t seem to answer your questions, they probably exaggerated their skills or experience. It’s also a good idea to ask others who met the candidate if they felt anything was off about the person’s behavior.

A long-term fix

While these tips from OfficeTeam can help you catch resume fibs as you go, there may be something you can do to reduce the amount of candidates who feel the need to lie.

If you use screening software to eliminate applicants who don’t meet certain requirements, examine those keywords and criteria. Are they so essential to the position that anyone without them should be immediately out of the running? Ask yourself if it’s possible a good candidate could be missing a skill or two. If the answer is yes, change those settings.

And as time-consuming as it would be to screen applicants without software, consider it. Candidates would be much more willing to tell the truth from the beginning if they knew a computer wouldn’t automatically weed them out.

Not all lies are created equal

So once you’ve caught a candidate in a lie … what do you do?

Obviously, some resume fibs are more serious than others. It’s up to you to decide what to do.

We suggest focusing on what you really need out of the candidate. If they embellished on an unimportant aspect of the resume, but have the qualifications where it counts, it could be worth overlooking the lie.

Some lies should take the candidate out of the running immediately. Big things, like applicants lying about their education or positions they’ve had, clearly show they’re not trustworthy.

Need to attract millennials? Offer student loan benefits!

If you want to attract and retain millennials, it’s all about the benefits. And no perks are more sought after among this group than student loan benefits.

Ten years ago, millennials flocked to employers offering free snacks and ping-pong tables, but as this demographic matures, they seek more meaningful benefits from their company with long-term results. Similarly, growing companies have a hyper-sensitive need to appeal to the millennial group because they will soon make up a clear majority of the workforce.

Focused on their financial futures

We talk to our client’s millennial staff all the time about their needs. My team also talks to our clients, most of which are millennials, every day about how important their financial future is to them.

What we’ve learned is that most millennials have lofty goals, and if a company can help them achieve those goals by supporting their financial future beyond just an income, they have a strong chance of attracting top-performing talent. Millennials also focus on values, so if a company can demonstrate how they support and reflect their employees’ values – financial and otherwise – that goes a long way.

Student loan debt is considered an epidemic in our country and is a major obstacle to the financial independence and goals that millennials seek.  Those with student loans are constantly looking for ways to contribute savings to their payments – from more practical strategies like refinancing or taking on a “side hustle,” to extremes like selling their eggs or participating in medical trials.

Enlightened companies are beginning to recognize how student loan repayment programs can benefit their employees by enabling financial independence, which naturally creates a more positive outlook on their professional and personal life. According to a recent study we conducted with LendEdu, we found that 58% of millennials would prefer student loan refinancing benefits from employers over additional vacation days – pretty powerful! This shows, plain and simple, how millennials are looking for benefits and employers that support their financial well-being.

Offering a student debt repayment benefit reinforces that employers care about the same things their employees do, establishing trust and demonstrating how the company and staff have the same values. It also helps to boost employee morale and satisfaction, and a satisfied workforce is one that’s likely more productive, committed to their team’s success and loyal to their company.

Employers as advocates

On the recruitment side, this benefit allows employers to attract top-performing millennials who seek employers that advocate for their financial health. Companies that are first to introduce this benefit are shaping their brand perception as one that’s invested not only in the financial health of their employees, but in doing good for people facing an extreme burden.

In a time where job switching has become more common – and where 50% of millennials carry student loan debt – student loan refinancing benefits can help encourage employees to stick around for the long-haul. This benefit establishes trust and demonstrates that employers care deeply about the financial future and overall well-being of their staff, which, for millennials, is far more appealing than most “work perks.”

 

 

30 employee handbook do’s and don’ts from the NLRB

To help employers craft handbooks that don’t violate the National Labor Relations Act, the National Labor Relations Board has issued a compilation of rules it has found to be illegal — and rewritten them to illustrate how they can comply with the law.

It was issued as a memorandum by NLRB General Counsel Richard F. Griffin, Jr. to “help employers to review their handbooks and other rules, and conform them, if necessary, to ensure they are lawful.”

Specifically, the memorandum points out employer policies found to violate and conform to Section 7 of the NLRA.

The main area of concern

Section 7 mandates that employees be allowed to participate in “concerted activity” to help improve the terms and conditions of their work.

The NLRB has made it abundantly clear recently that it’s on the lookout for rules that:

  • explicitly restrict protected concerted activity, and/or
  • could be construed to restrict protected Section 7 activity.

One thing the memorandum makes very clear: extremely subtle variations in language could be the difference between having a legal policy in the NLRB’s eyes and having one that’s viewed as violating the NLRA.

What to say, what not to say

Here are many of the dos and don’ts highlighted by the memorandum, separated by topic:

Rules regarding confidentiality

  • Illegal: “Do not discuss ‘customer or employee information’ outside of work, including ‘phone numbers [and] addresses.’” The NLRB said, in addition to the overbroad reference to “employee information,” the blanket ban on discussing employee contact info, without regard for how employees obtain that info, is facially illegal.
  • Illegal: “Never publish or disclose [the Employer’s] or another’s confidential or other proprietary information. Never publish or report on conversations that are meant to be private or internal to [the Employer].” The NLRB said a broad reference to “another’s” information, without clarification, would reasonably be interpreted to include other employees’ wages and other terms and conditions of employment.
  • Illegal: Prohibiting employees from “disclosing … details about the [Employer].” The NLRB said this is a broad restriction that failed to clarify that it doesn’t restrict Section 7 activity.
  • Legal: “No unauthorized disclosure of ‘business “secrets” or other confidential information.’”
  • Legal: “Misuse or unauthorized disclosure of confidential information not otherwise available to persons or firms outside [Employer] is cause for disciplinary action, including termination.”
  • Legal: “Do not disclose confidential financial data, or other non-public proprietary company information. Do not share confidential information regarding business partners, vendors or customers.”

The NLRB said the last three rules above were legal because: “1) they do not reference information regarding employees or employee terms and conditions of employment, 2) although they use the general term “confidential,” they do not define it in an overbroad manner, and 3) they do not otherwise contain language that would reasonably be construed to prohibit Section 7 communications.”

Rules regarding conduct toward the company and supervisors

  • Illegal: “Be respectful to the company, other employees, customers, partners, and competitors.”
  • Illegal: “Do ‘not make fun of, denigrate, or defame your co-workers, customers, franchisees, suppliers, the Company, or our competitors.’”
  • Illegal: “Be respectful of others and the Company.”
  • Illegal: “No defamatory, libelous, slanderous or discriminatory comments about [the Company], its customers and/or competitors, its employees or management.’”

The NLRB said the rules above were unlawfully overbroad because: “employees reasonably would construe them to ban protected criticism or protests regarding their supervisors, management, or the employer in general.”

  • Illegal: “Disrespectful conduct or insubordination, including, but not limited to, refusing to follow orders from a supervisor or a designated representative.”
  • Illegal: “‘Chronic resistance to proper work-related orders or discipline, even though not overt insubordination’ will result in discipline.”

The NLRB said the rules above, while banning “insubordination,” also ban “conduct that does not rise to the level of insubordination, which reasonably would be understood as including protected concerted activity.”

  • Illegal: “Refrain from any action that would harm persons or property or cause damage to the Company’s business or reputation.”
  • Illegal: “It is important that employees practice caution and discretion when posting content [on social media] that could affect [the Employer’s] business operation or reputation.”
  • Illegal: “Do not make ‘statements “that damage the company or the company’s reputation or that disrupt or damage the company’s business relationships.”‘”
  • Illegal: “Never engage in behavior that would undermine the reputation of [the Employer], your peers or yourself.”

The NLRB said the rules above “were unlawfully overbroad because they reasonably would be read to require employees to refrain from criticizing the employer in public.

  • Legal: “No ‘rudeness or unprofessional behavior toward a customer, or anyone in contact with’ the company.”
  • Legal: “Employees will not be discourteous or disrespectful to a customer or any member of the public while in the course and scope of [company] business.”

The NLRB said the rules above are legal because they wouldn’t lead an employee to believe they restrict criticism of the company.

  • Legal: “Each employee is expected to work in a cooperative manner with management/supervision, coworkers, customers and vendors.” The NLRB says employees would reasonably understand that this states the employer’s legitimate expectation that employees work together in an atmosphere of civility.
  • Legal: “Each employee is expected to abide by Company policies and to cooperate fully in any investigation that the Company may undertake.” The NLRB said this rule is legal because “employees would reasonably interpret it to apply to employer investigations of workplace misconduct rather than investigations of unfair labor practices or preparations for arbitration.”
  • Legal: “‘Being insubordinate, threatening, intimidating, disrespectful or assaulting a manager/supervisor, coworker, customer or vendor will result in’ discipline.” The NLRB said: “Although a ban on being  disrespectful’ to management, by itself, would ordinarily be found to unlawfully chill Section 7 criticism of the employer, the term here is contained in a larger provision that is clearly focused on serious misconduct, like insubordination, threats, and assault. Viewed in that context, we concluded that employees would not reasonably believe this rule to ban protected criticism.”

Rules regarding conduct between employees

  • Illegal: “‘Don’t pick fights’ online.”
  • Illegal: “Do not make ‘insulting, embarrassing, hurtful or abusive comments about other company employees online,’ and ‘avoid the use of offensive, derogatory, or prejudicial comments.’”
  • Illegal: “Show proper consideration for others’ privacy and for topics that may be considered objectionable or inflammatory, such as politics and religion.”
  • Illegal: “Do not send ‘unwanted, offensive, or inappropriate’ e-mails.”

The NLRB said the rules above were unlawfully overbroad because employees would reasonably construe them to restrict protected discussions with their co-workers.

  • Legal: “[No] ‘Making inappropriate gestures, including visual staring.’”
  • Legal: “Any logos or graphics worn by employees ‘must not reflect any form of violent, discriminatory, abusive, offensive, demeaning, or otherwise unprofessional message.’”
  • Legal: “[No] ‘Threatening, intimidating, coercing, or otherwise interfering with the job performance of fellow employees or visitors.’”
  • Legal: “No ‘harassment of employees, patients or facility visitors.’”
  • Legal: “No ‘use of racial slurs, derogatory comments, or insults.’”

The NLRB said the rules above were legal because: “when an employer’s professionalism rule simply requires employees to be respectful to customers or competitors, or directs employees not to engage in unprofessional conduct, and does not mention the company or its management, employees would not reasonably believe that such a rule prohibits Section 7-protected criticism of the company.

Your HR Partner

Contact Us

Social