The Best Managers Expect Change Then Embrace It

Change is inevitable. It can be driven by internal factors such as a merger or an acquisition to grow the business. Or, it can begin with the resignation of a key leader, or the hiring of someone new to the organization. Change can also be driven by external factors such as the addition of a new product, a new regulation requirement. Or, it can begin with the introduction of another competitor to the market.

Because we all know change is inevitable, managers can drive future success in their departments by fostering a positive attitude toward change. 

How?

By being fully aware of the need for the change and the direction the organization is headed.

  • An aware manager can better articulate to employees where the company is now and where leadership sees it in the future. 
  • Managers should also be able to articulate why the company needs to change, relative to things like shifting market forces, new opportunities, financial issues, or a new strategic approach.

By anticipating it and purposefully planning for change. 

  • Employees work better with concrete, achievable goals.
  • A manager can help employees see the roles they play in achieving the new goals and what it will mean for them, their coworkers, their unit, and the organization once the goals are achieved.

By eliminating fear of change. Address change in an intentional, goal-oriented manner. 

  • A manager should recognize and describe change as something that people should do, not something that is done to them.
  • Encourage risk taking and opinion sharing. The most important thing to help employees adapt to change is to create trust. One way this can be accomplished is by creating an environment in which people will not face consequences for trying something new and questioning established processes.

By encouraging inclusion in the process. A manager will make employees more comfortable with change when they invite them to participate in planning for or implementing it because they gain some sense of control which reduces their fears.

  • Hold all hands meetings where you allow employees to submit questions and receive answers from senior level leaders.
  • Adopt a continuous feedback tool where employees can give feedback directly to leaders directly involved in the implementation of a change.
     

Blog written by:

Tina Garner, PHR, SHRM-CP

Human Resources Director, RideNow Powersports

Your HR Partner

Contact Us

Social