You Can’t Wear That! Dealing With An Employee Who Dresses Inappropriately

If you’re a small business owner with staff, at some point you’re going to have to deal with a sticky, employee-related situation. Whether it’s an employee who’s always out sick, staff who look for sneaky ways to abuse benefit privileges or team members being careless on social media, your people may make choices that don’t suit your business—including what they wear to work.

It’s a situation no business owner wants to face, but you and your employees may not be on the same page when it comes to appropriate work attire. As workplace dress codes continue to get more casual across the country, business owners and their staff may struggle to determine what’s acceptable to wear at work and why.

Use these tips to determine how to communicate with staff when an employee dresses inappropriately.

1. Have an answer for ‘Why Can’t I Wear This?’

It’s important that all members of your staff understand why certain clothing items or styles aren’t acceptable in your workplace, and that sometimes it’s about more than just making a good impression. For instance, if you work in an environment with machinery, tools, heavy equipment or other potential dangers, inappropriate clothing may not adequately protect  your workers. Even worse, some clothing, such as wide, loose sleeves, may interfere with equipment and pose a safety hazard.

2. Send out reminders when necessary.

Sometimes, the best way to deal with a minor “wardrobe infraction” is to post a reminder list on the wall in the break room or send out a simple company-wide email reminding your staff of the expected dress code. This subtle reminder may be all that’s required to get the attention of the specific offender, plus any others who may be tempted to stray toward inappropriate clothing choices for work. If this doesn’t work, though, prepare to talk to the staff member in question.

3. Be really specific about acceptable work clothing.

When communicating to your employee about what is and isn’t acceptable attire, be as specific as possible. Explain that what they’re wearing isn’t safe while working at a lathe, for example. Also prepare to clearly explain what’s included in any terminology you use. Instead of saying that your employee should avoid “casual wear,” specify that they should avoid “weekend casual wear” and list the clothing items that are included in this category.

For example, your non-acceptable “weekend” casual wear list could include:

  • Athletic shoes
  • Flip-flops
  • Sweatpants or yoga pants
  • Hats
  • Hoodies and sweatshirts
  • Halter tops
  • Crop-tops (belly-baring shirts)
  • Jeans

And your acceptable “business casual” list could include:

  • Khakis
  • Cotton trousers
  • Skirts
  • Blouses
  • Polo shirts
  • Pullover sweaters
  • Cardigans

The key is to clearly communicate to all your staff what is and isn’t acceptable work attire.

4. Understand the do’s and don’ts for talking about inappropriate clothing.

Before you talk to your employee about his or her clothing choices, review this list of what to do and what to avoid.

Do

  • Make the conversation easier by preparing. Make sure you are well-versed on your company dress code, and more importantly, that your dress code is legally compliant.
  • Choose a private setting to talk to the staff member, so you can address the issue without embarrassing them in front of others.
  • Choose your words carefully. For example, “I’ve noticed your clothing choices, which, though they may be appropriate outside of our office/shop/business, are not in keeping with our dress code. I’d appreciate your cooperation in making some minor changes.”
  • Introduce your meeting as a time clarify your dress code and make sure your employee understands it.
  • Be specific about the problem. For example, “The shoes you’re wearing expose your toes, so they don’t meet the safety requirement of closed-toe shoes in our dress code.”

Don’t

  • Attend alone, especially when speaking with an opposite-sex employee. Bring in another staff member.
  • Make it a personal attack on the  person’s character. This is about the clothing they wear at work, not an attack on their lifestyle, religion or political choices.
  • Use the word “improve.” If you do, it may sound like you’re dealing with a performance issue.

5. Have “The Talk” with your employee.

If an employee wears something inappropriate after you’ve sent out a group email, it’s time to talk specifically to them. Keep in mind the information from tips three and four, and act quickly.

“Don’t delay taking action—even if just verbally and even if you learn of the infraction long after it occurs,” says human resources consultant Linda Michaels. Clearly point out any dress code violations plus how to remedy them.

Discussions about acceptable workplace clothing can be uncomfortable. They require a sensitive and delicate approach. To keep inappropriate clothing at work from becoming an extended issue, the best strategies are to head it off before it even starts and address any wardrobe infractions immediately.

5 Tips to Protect Your Company from Wrongful Termination Lawsuits

Most jobs are considered to be “at will” employment, but employees may still be able to sue an employer if the reason for termination is determined to be illegal. Unfortunately, termination is something that nearly every workplace must deal with, so it’s important that this matter be handled with delicacy and professionalism. The following are a few tips that can keep a workplace safe from wrongful termination lawsuits.

1. Communicate Regarding Expectations

Letting employees know what’s expected from day one can help to prevent performance issues and protect an employer if an employee is fired for failing to meet expectations. Of course, regular feedback should be given so that employees know whether or not they’re meeting expectations. If an employee is consistently warned about performance issues, it should be no surprise when termination follows.

2. Keep Great Documentation

Even if an employee is alerted to issues with performance, tardiness, or behavior, it can be difficult to prove that this feedback was given if there’s no documentation. Keeping great records can not only help to protect an employer from wrongful termination, it can also improve transparency and communication regarding ongoing issues. This can in turn improve consistency and organization, preventing problems from several angles.

3. Be Compassionate During Terminations

Being fired has been identified as one of the most stressful things that can happen in a person’s life. When the time comes to terminate someone, no matter what the reasons for the termination, being compassionate can help to ease the inherent tension in the situation. How an employee feels during and after the termination can be a big factor in whether or not the employee feels the need to pursue legal action.

4. Purchase Liability Insurance

Liability insurance is an added expense for the business, but may help to save dollars if an employee sues the company for wrongful termination. Not all liability insurance is the same, however. It may be prudent to make sure the option still exists to defend against a lawsuit and avoid a settlement, even if liability insurance is available to help pay settlements when they are found to be the best course of action.

5. Help Employees with Next Steps

Employees that find new jobs very quickly after termination usually don’t sue for wrongful termination. For this reason, it can be beneficial to assist employees with next steps as part of the termination process. Providing a reference or helping with networking, especially in cases where an employee was let go because of downsizing, can help the employee to move forward fast and prevent stress-inducing downtime.

Termination can be difficult for both employers and employees, so following certain guidelines can ease stress of the situation and prevent the hard feelings that sometimes lead to wrongful termination lawsuits. By detailing expectations and establishing a consistent chain of events that happens prior to termination, employers can protect themselves from liability. Employees may also feel more secure knowing what to expect and seeing that other employees are held accountable.

Legal Requirements to Fulfill Before Hiring Employees

Your business may be raring to hire its first employee, but have you taken all the necessary steps to set yourself up as a lawful employer?

Beyond the sheer decision of whether to add new employees to your business, there are several steps required by the federal and state government that must be taken before you can hire someone.

Here’s a look at 10 legal requirements every employer must do before taking on a new hire:

1. Apply for an EIN.

Every employer—even if you just employ one person—is required to have a federal Employer Identification Number (EIN) that serves as the entity’s tax ID. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) offers several ways to apply: The fastest and preferred way to file is online using the Internet application, which allows you to receive your EIN immediately.

But you can also apply by phone, standard mail or fax. All you need to apply is the taxpayer ID number, such as the Social Security number, of the principal officer or owner of the company and basic information about the company, such as whether and how it’s incorporated.

2. Register with your state’s unemployment insurance office.

For every employee you hire, including the first one, you will need to pay unemployment taxes to your state. This generally requires registering with the state office that oversees unemployment insurance and then reporting quarterly wage details of each employee along with making the required payments into the fund. The taxes can typically be paid electronically.

Each state has its own rules and deadlines for payments, so it’s important to familiarize yourself with your state’s rules. All states now have online resources to inform employers on their requirements regarding unemployment insurance. Do a Google search for “unemployment insurance,” “employers” and your state’s name to find your state’s website with that information.

3. Verify each prospective hire’s eligibility to work.

Before you hire someone, you need to verify that they are who they say they are, and that they are legally able to work inside in the United States. This is done through filling out the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ Form I-9 with the new worker after they’ve accepted the job offer.

Along with filling out the form, the new employee will have to provide an original document (such as a U.S. passport) or documents (such as a state driver’s license and a Social Security card) that prove their identity and legal status to work in the U.S. You’ll need to examine the documents for authenticity (and perhaps photocopy them). A Form I-9 must be completed within three days of a worker’s first day on the job.

You don’t need to file Form I-9s with USCIS, but you will need to have them on file for three years after hire (or one year after employment ends, whatever is later). It is best to keep all your Form I-9s in a file or binder that only a few people in human resources are able to access, according to the Society for Human Resource Management. You’ll need to be able to produce I-9s should Immigration and Customs Enforcement come calling.

4. Look into your state’s workers’ compensation insurance rules—and get coverage.

Most states require employers to carry workers’ compensation coverage in case an employee gets injured on the job, though some exempt very small employers. It’s important to find out your state’s particular rules and get the required coverage. This database gives a brief summary of each state’s worker’s compensation rules along with links to the applicable state website where you can find more detailed information.

5. Report new employees to state registry.

You will want to keep employee records—such as full names, contact information and Social Security number—for your own administrative purposes. But you’re also required by law to collect that information.

Federal law requires employers to report basic information on new employees within 20 days of hire to the state in which the employee will work. (Some states have even tighter deadlines.) This information is put into the National Directory of New Hires that is used to locate and withhold income from people who owe child support.

The information required includes the new employee’s full name, address and Social Security, your EIN and address and the employee’s date of hire. Most employers collect this information by using an employee information form that all new hires must fill out. (Read eight tips for creating an employee information form.)

6. Set up a payroll and tax withholding system.

You’ll need to withhold federal and state income taxes, as well as federal Social Security and Medicare payroll taxes, from each employee’s paycheck. A reputable third-party payroll provider makes all of this this easy by providing you with a solution in which you can simply type each employee’s compensation, employee benefit deduction and tax withholding information into the system and it will automatically create regular paychecks (paper or electronic) for you while deducting the correct amount for each type of tax withholding for each pay period.

Many large payroll providers also bundle in extra services, such as human resources. Make sure to thoroughly review your options and find a payroll provider that meets all your needs at the right price. You’ll want to find a payroll provider that also has strong customer service and support in case you encounter any problems or have questions.

7. Have all employees fill out form W-4.

Before you can start paying an employee, you need to know how many “allowances” he or she wants withheld for taxes. The more allowances an employee decides to take, the less tax that will be withheld from their paycheck.

Again, payroll providers typically provide a W-4 form and make it easy to enter the information into the system. You just have to ensure every new hire fills it out and submits it. You can also download the W-4 form from IRS.gov.

8. Get and post employee notices.

There are a number of federal labor laws that require employers to post their requirements in conspicuous places in the workplace so that workers understand their rights under the law. For example, you’ll likely need to display a poster about the Fair Labor Standards Act and its rules establishing a minimum wage, overtime pay rules, child labor restrictions, nursing mother protections and more.

What you’re required to post depends on such factors as the size and nature of your business, which state you’re in, whether you have federal contracts or employee disabled or foreign workers, and more. The U.S. Department of Labor has a FirstStep Poster Advisor that will guide you through a series of questions and then provide you PDFs of the posters you likely need to display.

Also note that individual states may have their own poster display requirements. So it makes sense to also contact your state’s labor department for guidance. The U.S. Department of Labor keeps an online contact list of state labor offices.

9. Comply with OSHA rules.

Employing workers also means that you must comply with the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and its rules, which go back to the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970.

OSHA rules cover a variety of workplace conditions. Think having safe tools and equipment, safe use and maintenance of the equipment, safe handling of hazardous chemicals and much more.

You’ll need to use codes, posters, labels and signs to warn your workers about dangers, as well as provide them necessary training and medical examinations. The OSHA poster, or its state-level equivalent, must be displayed in a prominent workplace location.

10. Establish any necessary employee benefits.

Small businesses with fewer than 50 full-time-equivalent (FTE) employees are exempt from the Affordable Care Act (ACA) mandate that requires larger businesses to carry health insurance for their employees or pay an annual penalty. That said, the federal government offers incentives for small employers who do offer insurance.

Employers with fewer than 50 FTE employees can get their employees insurance through the Small Business Health Options Program (SHOP) exchanges. Those with fewer than 25 FTE employees can qualify for tax credits worth up to 50% the cost of the health insurance premium.

Depending on your industry and market, offering health insurance to employees may be a smart, competitive move even if you’re not required by law to offer it. Several states are also in the process of enacting regulations that will require employers who don’t offer their employees a standard retirement plan—such as a 401(k) or pension—a state-sponsored retirement plan.

California, for example, is phasing in rules requiring employers with five or more employees to either automatically make IRA payroll deductions for each employee through its CalSavers Program or offer an employer-sponsored retirement plan.

Covering Your Bases

Though these are the main steps employers must take that are required by federal or state law, there are other smart things to do before you start employing people. These include writing an employee handbook, so there are no questions about your rules and protocols for employees (even your first hire), and creating a personnel file for every employee.

While keeping personnel files is not technically required by aw, it protects you if you ever get sued by an employee. It also makes it easy for you to quickly find any relevant information about an employee, including their basic information, work and performance history, and benefits enrollment information, and workplace injury history.

Medical records, any disciplinary actions taken against the employee, and I-9 forms should be kept outside the personnel file. (Nolo offers tips on what should—and shouldn’t—go into an employee’s personnel file.) Once you create personnel files, it’s important to have an organized and consistent system for maintaining those files. For example, you’ll need to limit who can access the files to just supervisors of the employee. States also have various rules for how much access employers must give employees to their personnel files, if requested.

Before you hire, it’s essential to thoroughly review all the required steps you need to ensure you’re not exposing yourself to legal problems. The payroll provider you choose to go with may be able to help you with several of the steps, depending on the level of service you choose.

Once you get the right processes and procedures in place, adding new employees should be much easier and faster. It’s just getting set up in the first place that takes time.

2018 Compensation and Benefits Workshop

We are excited to host a half day workshop on October 3rd at Because Space for Life.

When employees feel satisfied and valued in their roles, they’ll be more engaged and motivated to work harder and deliver top results.

At the 2018 Comp & Benefits Workshop, HR thought leaders and experts will touch on aspects of Total Rewards – from compensation, to work-life effectiveness and benefits, including pay equity and paid time off. You’ll walk away with practical tips and new strategies to ultimately create breakthrough performance throughout your company.

Agenda

 7:30 – 8:15am Continental Breakfast, Registration, Network, Meet Vendors
 8:15 – 8:30am Welcome message
 8:30 – 10:00am How to Become a Compensation Nerd

 

Does compensation mystify you?  Well, you’re not alone.  Join your fellow generalists on a journey to understand compensation basics and some strategic approaches to forming your company’s pay practices. In this workshop you will learn:

·       The eight questions to answer before you start solving your compensation issues.

·       How to think about and use survey data

·       How to structure your base pay into grades and ranges

10:00 – 10:15am Break with Vendors
10:15 – 11:45am Winning at Total Rewards: How to HIGH FIVE your Total Rewards program!

 

A 90-minute tour of the FIVE Total Rewards components that will make your TR program successful.  In this workshop you will learn:

·       Review the foundation of Total Rewards and the FIVE key components that make up a great TR program

·       For each of the FIVE key components, a quick look at best practices and how to set up that part of your TR plan if you don’t already have it

·       Resources to help assist in the setup and maintenance of the FIVE key components

11:45 – 12:00pm Wrap Up, Raffle Prizes


Why Attend?

  • Evaluate your organization’s existing total rewards strategy using current trend information.
  • Discover new strategies to build a “Best Place to Work” culture that attracts and retains the best and brightest talent.
  • Determine how to influence your organization’s success by learning real-world and practical solutions to your top business and HR challenges.
  • Understand why engaging employees is the path to profitability and business growth and how to use employee engagement as the ultimate competitive advantage.
  • Develop an impactful total rewards strategy with help from peer insights and analytics and learn how to communicate your offerings, so employees understand the value.
  • Network with more than 150 HR professionals who are responsible for compensation and benefits plans and strategies.

 Meet Our Speakers

Gail Paul is the CEO of StrategiComp.  She has over 25 years of experience as both consultant and practitioner in the areas of compensation, executive compensation and benefits.

StrategiComp, formed in 2016, has many diverse publicly and privately funded clients from multiple industries.

Gail’s background includes serving as the top Total Rewards executive for publicly traded organizations Universal Technical Institute and Del Webb Corporation (Pulte Homes), where she was responsible for managing executive compensation programs, pay and incentive structures, equity incentive plans, and creating and communicating the compensation philosophy and strategies.

Gail has also worked as a Senior Consultant at Mercer H.R. Consulting / Mercer Health & Benefits, providing comprehensive HR and benefits consultation to large corporate and government clients in Arizona and Nevada. She was the founder and principle of Matrix Compensation & Benefits Consulting, where she crafted powerful compensation and total rewards strategies for a wide variety of clients, public, private, Fortune 500 and small firms.

Gail is a Certified Executive Compensation Professional through WorldatWork and is an active member.  In addition, Gail is a Predictive Index Certified Partner through MindWire Group where she serves as Vice President/Partner.

 

Sheila Krueger is a Total Rewards Expert with Televerde. Sheila M Krueger is what is referred to as a “seasoned” professional. Not only is she tender and juicy, she’s got over 20 years of practical and strategic experience in the Total Rewards arena. Starting with a stint selecting and installing an HRIS system (when she didn’t even know what HRIS stood for), to overseeing Total Rewards programs for companies of 200, 750, and 3500 employees, Sheila has heard all the stories and survived to tell the tales.

 

Meet Our Vendors

Edward Jones – Carina Burtell

HRCI Credits Pending

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Why should you improve your employee onboarding program?

Employee onboarding is a very method used in talent acquisition.
If done right, employee onboarding process can easily become your secret weapon for hiring and retaining talent.

A successful employee onboarding program ensures that your best candidate actually shows up on their first day at the new job.

This is because a successful employee onboarding process starts at the moment your best candidate accepts your offer.
If you don’t engage you best candidates until their start date, they might accept a better offer or a counteroffer from their current employer.

It also helps to improve retention, engagement, satisfaction, and productivity of your new employees.

According to the Society For Human Resources Management (SHRM):

  • 69% of employees are more likely to stay with a company for three years if they experienced great onboarding.
  • Organizations with a standard onboarding process experience 50% greater new-hire productivity.
  • 54% of companies with onboarding programs reported higher employee engagement.

3 best employee onboarding tips

Here are the best 3 tips that will help get the most out of your onboarding program:

Tip #1: Plan and organize 

If you want to maximize the power of your onboarding process, you need to carefully structure it. To learn how, check out our step-by-step Guide on how to successfully onboard new employees.

Keep in mind that:

  1. A successful onboarding is a process
    A successful employee onboarding is not an event that takes place on your new employee’s first day at the office. It is a continuous process that starts at the moment your best candidate accepts your job offer.
  2. A successful onboarding is people oriented
    A successful employee onboarding is not focused on tasks, but on people.
    The human touch drives onboarding success.  The secret of great onboarding is the fact that it makes your new employees feel welcomed and integrated into your company culture from the day one!

Tip #2: Automate 

Automating your employee onboarding process will help you save time and your nerves. There are many different employee onboarding tools you can use to easily automate your onboarding process.

There are 3 main types of employee onboarding tools:

  1. Checklists: Checklists are the most simple and straightforward tool that can help you onboard new employees.
  2. Specialized tools: Specialized employee onboarding tools are tools created for the sole purpose of improving the employee onboarding process.
  3. Integrated tools: Integrated tools are comprehensive, all-in-one tools that offer solutions for your whole HR management process, including payroll, benefits, time and attendance, etc.

Tip#3: Be creative 

To make your new employees’ onboarding experience truly unique, you need to get creative! Luckily for you, we compiled the best and the most innovative employee onboarding ideas and examples from experts to inspire you!

Here are 3 simple, but creative employee onboarding ideas you can easily implement:

  1. Welcome GIF or video: Gather your team and create a welcome video for your new employee!
    If your employees shy away from a camera or you don’t have enough time on your hands, go with the quicker version – create a welcome GIF!
  2. Decorate your new employee’s desk: Decorate your new employee’s desk with some balloons, welcome sign and maybe even some cake! You can also pack your company swag (such as branded notebook, pens, T-shirt, water bottle, etc.) as a present!
  3. 100th-day party: Throwing a 100 day on the job party for your employees is a great opportunity to shower them with some attention and remind them how much you are happy to have them joined your company.
Top 10 Don’ts When You Fire an Employee

Firing an employee is stressful for all parties—not just for the employee losing a job. No matter how well you’ve communicated about performance problems with the employee, almost no one believes that they will actually get fired. With cause, too. The average employer waits too long to fire a non-performing employee much of the time.

So, employees convince themselves that they won’t get fired: they think that you like them; they think that you know that they are a nice person, or you recognize that they’ve been trying hard. In fact, you may believe and think all of these things. But, none of your feelings matter when the employee is not performing his job.

Firing an employee may take you awhile—usually much longer than the circumstances merit. Because you are kind, caring, and tend to give employees another chance. But, these are the top 10 things you do not want to do when you do decide to fire an employee.

Don’t Fire an Employee Unless You Are Meeting Face-to-Face

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Do not fire an employee using any electronic method—no emails, IMs, voicemails, or phone calls. Even a letter is inappropriate when you fire an employee.

When you fire an employee give them the courtesy that you would extend to any human being. They deserve a face-to-face meeting when you fire an employee. Nothing else works.

The fired employee will remember and your other employees who remain have even longer memories. And, no, during this time of social media dominance, don’t believe for a minute that the circumstances of the firing will remain secret.

You will have created a scenario in which your remaining employees are afraid to trust you. Or worse, they trust that you may harm them, too.

Don’t Fire an Employee Without Warning

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Nothing makes an employee angrier than feeling blindsided when fired. Unless an immediate, egregious act occurs, the employee should experience coaching and performance feedback over time. Before you fire an employee, try to determine what is causing the employee to fail.

If you decide the employee is able to improve her performance, provide whatever assistance is needed to encourage and support the employee. Document each step in the improvement process so that the employee has a record of what is happening at each step. The employer is also protecting its own interests in the event of a lawsuit over the termination.

If you are confident that the employee can improve, and the employee’s role allows, a performance improvement plan (PIP) may show the employee specific, measurable improvement requirements. (A PIP is difficult, if not impossible, with a manager or HR staff, once you have lost confidence in their performance.)

Do not, however, use a PIP unless you are confident that the employee can improve. The agonizing process of meeting weekly to chart no progress is horrible for the employee, the manager, and the HR rep, too.

The actual termination—while almost always somewhat of a surprise—should not come with no warning.

Don’t Fire an Employee Without a Witness

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Especially in the US, anyone can sue anybody, at any time, for any reason. In employment termination cases, the employee has to find a lawyer who believes he can win the case and thus, collect his fee. The best practice is to include a second employee in the meeting when you fire an employee.

This gives you an individual who hears and participates in the employment termination in addition to the manager. This person can also help pick up the slack if the hiring manager runs out of words or is unsure of what to say or do next.

This witness is often the Human Resources staff person. The HR person has more experience than the average manager, in firing employees, so can also help keep the discussion on track and moving to completion.

The HR person can also ensure that employees are treated fairly, equally, and with professionalism across departments and individual managers. This limits your liability when you fire an employee.

Don’t Supply Lengthy Rationale and Examples for Why You Are Firing the Employee

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If you have coached and documented an employee’s performance over time and provided frequent feedback, there is no point in rehashing your dissatisfaction when you fire the employee. It accomplishes nothing and is cruel.

Yet, every employee will ask you why. So, have an answer prepared that is honest and correctly summarizes the situation without detail or placing blame.

You want the employee to maintain her dignity during an employment termination. So, you might say, “We’ve already discussed your performance issues. We are terminating your employment because your performance does not meet the standards we expect from this position.

“We wish you well in your future endeavors and trust that you will locate a position that is a better fit for you. You have many talents and we are confident that you will locate a position that can take advantage of them.”

Or you can simply remind the employee that you have discussed issues with him or her over time, and leave it at that.

The more detailed you become, the less able you will be to use any of the information you discover following the employment termination in a subsequent lawsuit. And, as an employer, you will always find out additional information.

For example, think about a terminated HR staff person who had months of new employee paperwork in her drawer. The employees had not been enrolled in healthcare insurance.

In another example, a marketing employee had the entire bookkeeping for her bar which she operated in the evenings on her company-owned computer. (The employer was kind and gave her a copy of her bookkeeping which they didn’t need to do.)

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