How to Spot and Mitigate Employee Discontent

Every good employer wants to have a workplace where employees feel content and satisfied. While the reality is that it is not going to possible to please everyone all of the time, you may be able to spot discontent and take steps to mitigate it before you lose good employees. By taking a proactive approach to spotting and mitigating discontent, you may improve satisfaction, thereby lowering your turnover rate and possibly increasing productivity.

Signs That Employees Are Not Content

Discontent with a workplace rarely arises suddenly. Usually an employee will gradually become discontent over time because of different experiences within the workplace. You may begin to notice subtle changes, though these changes may not be readily identifiable as discontent at first.

Signs that an employee may be discontent include:

  • Slips in work performance
  • Disinterest in attending company events
  • Distancing from peers, even as it pertains to social situations
  • Bad moods or behavioral changes
  • Coming in late or leaving early
  • Disagreeing with management or creating friction
  • Gossiping about peers or managers

Ways to Address the Problem

If you have spotted signs of discontent, the first course of action should be to talk to the employee that seems to be discontent. In some cases, the discontent may actually stem from personal issues at home and have nothing to do with the workplace. In many cases, however, the employee is upset about a work situation.

Open Up Communication Lines

During the initial conversation about discontent, the employee may clam up due to nervousness or other emotions. It is important to let the employee know that they can come to you to discuss anything that they may be upset with in the future. Opening up the communication lines in this way –for all of the employees – may help to address discontent before it gets a foothold.

Really Listen and Respond to Employee Concerns

Hearing employees out is only half the battle, really listening and taking action based on those concerns is what will actually help to mitigate the discontent. While it may not be possible or sensible to make big changes based on everything that employees complain about, just taking the time to listen and explain why certain things must stay the way they are can help employees to feel more content.

Admit Mistakes and Move Forward

Sometimes employees are discontent because of the actions of a manager or employer. If this is the case, simply admitting the mistake or acknowledging the situation and working to move forward may assuage the discontent. Actions may need to be taken to prevent the same incident from occurring in the future, but admitting the mistake can go a long way toward making an employee feel valued.

Maintaining Contentment

After you have spotted and worked to mitigate discontent, the work is not done. It is important to use the information learned in order to improve the way that employees feel about the company and to prevent future discontent. Complimenting employee performance and checking in with employees to make sure that they feel valued may also help to prevent future stirrings of discontent.

7 Exit Interview Questions That May Help Prevent Your Next Vacancy

An exit interview is a prime opportunity for you to learn what your company could do better. Employees that already have at least one foot out the door are often more likely to be open and honest with you, as they have less at stake and aren’t looking to score brownie points. The following questions go above and beyond the standard “what did/didn’t you like about your job” and really get to the heart of what you can do better for your employees.

1. Why did you begin looking for a new job?

There is often one specific instance that motivated an employee to hit the job ads and start searching for a new place of employment. Encourage honesty in this answer, because the drive is often a disagreement with management. Whether it was a day with limited staff, a short-fused coworker, or a policy that didn’t click, the answers can all reveal how you can help prevent your next vacancy.

2. Did you feel that you were adequately recognized for your achievements?

Recognition isn’t the only important factor, but can go a long way in making an employee feel valued. If an employee that’s leaving answers “no,” find out what type of recognition they would have been satisfied with and why they feel the current system is inadequate.

3. Were you sufficiently trained for your role?

A large number of employees cite “insufficient training” as a reason for leaving a place of employment. There may be training gaps that you don’t notice that can be highlighted in an exit interview. Find out how training can be improved to more sufficiently prepare future employees.

4. Did you feel comfortable talking to your manager?

If there is a problem with the manager, an employee may feel trapped and unable to resolve their issue. In some cases, it seems like the easiest scenario is to quit. While this isn’t the only reason for leaving, too many employees cite problems with management for you to ignore this question during an exit interview.

5. Were your work goals and assignments reasonable and well communicated?

Overwhelmed employees aren’t happy or satisfied, neither are employees that feel that expectations aren’t being communicated. Identify whether employees feel goals are clear and reasonable so that you can make adjustments if necessary.

6. What would have influenced you to stay here?

While you won’t be able to accommodate every employee and convince them to stay, you may get an idea of what could be done better to reduce turnover by asking this question. If the employee is leaving to pursue a career in a completely different industry or type of company, their answers may not be completely applicable, but could still provide some insight. If their answers aren’t far fetched at all, you may just be able to win them back in the future.

7. Did you feel that the company culture was the right fit for you?

Company culture is incredibly important to employees’ daily life, but difficult to alter or nail down. It can be even more elusive for managers, as employees may alter their behavior when manager eyes are watching. An employee that is leaving is the perfect person to give you the inside scoop on the true culture that may be hiding.

What Employers Must Know About Hiring Employees With a Criminal History

Hiring a convicted felon isn’t what most businesses set out to do. In fact, most companies would prefer to hire people who will be soon nominated for sainthood, which leaves candidates with a criminal record out. Employers need to keep in mind, though, that many saints have checkered pasts and so may some of your best employees. Here’s what you need to know about hiring employees with a criminal history.

What Is Ban the Box?

Most job applications have a box that applicants check off to say whether or not they have any felony or misdemeanor convictions. But, 25 states and several cities have passed “ban-the-box” laws. Some additional states have “fair chance” legislation, which means that you can’t ask the applicant about convictions on a job application.

Individual state laws vary, so double check your state or other governmental jurisdiction’s laws before you ask a person to fill out an application. As a general rule, ban the box means that you can’t ask about any convictions until you get to the job offer stage of the selection process.

The Purpose of Ban-the-Box Laws

What’s the purpose behind these laws? The state has a vested interest in getting people with a criminal history working—having a job reduces the chance of recidivism. If you want to lower crime, you want people working instead of returning to their bad ways.

But the other reason for ban-the-box laws is to stop discrimination against black men. However, research has shown that this may not be working as desired—since employers can’t ask about criminal history, they are less likely to interview black and Hispanic candidates.

Researchers looked at low-skilled men between the ages of 25 to 34 and determined that “in ban-the-box areas…   employers are less likely to interview young, low-skilled black men because those groups are more likely to include ex-offenders. They instead focus on hiring groups made up of men they believe are less likely to have gone to prison.”

So, while the laws may help actual convicts, they can adversely affect low-skilled black men who have no criminal history.

When Can You Ask About a Person’s Criminal History?

In all states, you can ask about felony convictions before you actually hire an employee. The ban-the-box legislation just prevents you from asking about criminal history before you’re ready to make an offer. When you’re ready to make an offer you can do a background check which involves asking about any convictions.

Can You Reject an Applicant Because of a Criminal History?

The answer to this question is sometimes. Some convictions prevent you from having certain types of jobs altogether. For instance, if you run a daycare, you absolutely can and must reject convicted child sexual abusers. That’s an easy decision. In other areas, the decision is not so cut and dried.

Rejecting people based on their criminal history may violate the Civil Rights Act of 1964’s Title VII. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission says that there are two key points when considering how to treat convicted job candidates. They say:

  1. Title VII prohibits employers from treating people with similar criminal records differently because of their race, national origin, or another Title VII-protected characteristic (which includes color, sex, and religion).
  2. Title VII prohibits employers from using policies or practices that screen individuals based on criminal history information if:
    • They significantly disadvantage Title VII-protected individuals such as African Americans and Hispanics; AND
    • They do not help the employer accurately decide if the person is likely to be a responsible, reliable, or safe employee.

Ban-the-box legislation is an attempt to comply with the first part of this (although, it’s not working), but what about the second part? First, you can’t assume an arrest means a person committed a crime that would disqualify the person from the job.

If your candidate has a conviction, you can consider that they committed the crime of which they were convicted. If there is simply an arrest, you can use that to start an inquiry into whether or not the person should be disqualified.

How Do You Determine Whether to Hire a Candidate With a Criminal History?

But, how do you determine if the convicted person is “likely to be a responsible, reliable, or safe employee”? That’s going to vary based on state laws,  but here are some general guidelines.

  • Treat people of different races/genders the same. If you go ahead and hire a white man with a drug conviction because it was “just a youthful indiscretion” and then reject a black man with a similar conviction you’re violating the law.
  • How long has it been since the conviction? If the job candidate has a conviction for shoplifting from six months ago, you can make a strong argument that this is not a trustworthy individual. If that conviction occurred 20 years ago, however, and no repeat convictions have occurred—not so much.
  • How does the conviction relate to the job? You can reject a person who embezzled from a previous employer as your company’s comptroller, but probably not for a job as a landscaper with no access to funds.
  • Did you give the candidate a chance to explain himself? If a candidate has a conviction that you say disqualifies him for the position, the EEOC requires you to give the person a chance to “demonstrate that the exclusion should not be applied due to his particular circumstances.” This means that you’ll have to sit down and listen to what the candidate has to say and perhaps collect some additional information.

Always Consult With Your Attorney About Hiring Employees With a Criminal History

If you wish to reject a job candidate based on a conviction, before you do so, please consult with your employment law attorney. Because state and even local laws can vary considerably, you can’t make generalized judgments on what you think is best for your business. You need to ensure that you have followed the law precisely and that you aren’t violating Title VII in any way.

Many companies skip consulting with their attorney because that discussion costs money. But, it’s considerably cheaper to pay for an initial consultation than to have to pay for the resulting lawsuit. Remember, even lawsuits that you win are incredibly expensive to litigate.

For jobs with state licensing, use the licensing procedures as your guidelines. If the licensing agency allows the person to have a license with that particular conviction, you should most likely (consult with your attorney) not consider rejecting the candidate because of that conviction either.

When trying to decide how you want to shape your policy regarding convicted felons, consider the true nature of your business. Does your business require actual saints or are normal humans enough?

Disclaimer: Please note that the information provided, while authoritative, is not guaranteed for accuracy and legality. The site is read by a world-wide audience and employment laws and regulations vary from state to state and country to country. Please seek legal assistance, or assistance from State, Federal, or International governmental resources, to make certain your legal interpretation and decisions are correct for your location. This information is for guidance, ideas, and assistance.­­

How to Conduct An Internal Form I-9 Audit

When conducting your internal I-9 form audit start off by outlining your procedure and how you plan to conduct the audit

For Section Two of the I-9 form you’ll need to ensure one document from List A is included and completed or one document from List B and one from List C are listed and completed

When conducting your internal audit, Section Three of the I-9 form deals with reverification which only applies if evidence of employment authorization (List A or List C document) presented in Section two expires

The best way to correct the Form I-9 is to line through the portions of the form that contain incorrect information (preferably in a contrasting ink color), then enter the correct information, initial and date your correction


Dealing with I-9 Forms can be tricky. It’s definitely not the easiest part of your day, and it requires a lot of attention to detail. No one even wants to talk about the possibility of getting audited for your I-9 forms. But what if I told you it was actually pretty simple? In this blog, I am going to list off the six steps you need to conduct your own internal Form I-9 audit. So if you ever hear ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) knocking on your door, you’ll be ready!

Step One: Outline Your Procedure

When conducting your internal I-9 form audit start off by outlining your procedure and how you plan to conduct the audit. Your internal audit should concentrate on key problems that frequently arise during the completion of the I-9 form.

Conducting the Internal Audit – When preparing to conduct your internal audit be sure you account for the need of the following criteria:

  • Unbiased – Make sure the selection of Forms I-9 for an internal audit is not based on the employee’s race or nation origin. Either audit all forms, or audit a truly random sample of forms. An organization may not selectively choose which forms to audit.
  • Annual – This provides a defense against allegations of targeted internal Form I-9 auditing. Internal audit processes should mimic government compliance audit processes. This not only verifies Forms I-9 on file, but it also trains the Human Resources Department to prepare for actual government compliance audits.
  • Consistent – Either keep copies of all I-9 verification documents, or none of them. If your records are not complete, then you must either obtain the missing documents, or dispose of all collected verification documents.
  • Knowledgeable – Designate an “I-9 Officer” or Company Representative, responsible for knowing and applying Form I-9 rules. The authorized I-9 Officer should achieve the following:
    • Become well-versed on the correct completion of the Form I-9
    • Develop and enforce a compliant program
    • Create and implement internal training procedures
    • Conduct regular internal audits
    • Have a plan of action in the event of an ICE audit

Step Two: Auditing Section One of the I-9 Form

You’ll need to make sure you’re gathering all of the information below to complete step two, auditing Section One of the I-9 form.

Employee Information

  • Employee first and last names completed
  • Maiden name or other names if it is applicable; “N/A” for “Other Names Used” if it does not apply
  • Full address fields completed – No PO boxes allowed
  • Date of birth in mm/dd/yyyy format
  • Social Security Number (optional); Social Security Number mandatory for
  • E-Verify participants

Citizenship/Immigration Status

  • Status is selected (not more than one)
  • Lawful Permanent Resident – including alien registration number
  • If employee is not a permanent resident but has authorization to work in the United States, the alien number or admission number must be included and correctly stated
  • Expiration date of employment authorization is included and correctly stated

Employee Attestation

  • Employee’s signature
  • Date of employee’s execution of form
  • Form I-9 signed on the first day of employment or the period between the job being accepted by the employee and the first day of employment
  • Preparer/Translator Certification
  • Signature of preparer/translator if applicable
  • Name of preparer/translator correctly stated
  • Address of preparer/translator correctly stated

Step Three: Auditing Section Two of the I-9 Form

For Section Two of the I-9 form you’ll need to ensure one document from List A is included and completed or one document from List B and one from List C are listed and completed.

List A (Identity and Employment Authorization)

  • Appropriate document listed
  • List A document title correctly stated
  • List A document issuing authority correctly stated
  • List A document number correctly stated
  • List A document expiration date, if applicable, correctly stated
  • Receipt showing application for document accepted; awaiting original to be presented within 90 days

List B (Identity)

  • List B document title correctly stated
  • List B document issuing authority correctly stated
  • List B document number correctly stated
  • List B document expiration date, if applicable, correctly stated
  • Receipt showing application for document accepted; awaiting original to be presented within 90 days

List C (Employment Authorization)

  • Employee’s first day of employment correctly stated (mm/dd/yyyy)
  • Signature of Employer/Authorized Representative present and in correct box
  • Date of certification correctly stated (mm/dd/yyyy)
  • Certification signed by the third business day after the hire date
  • Title of Authorized Representative correctly stated
  • Last Name and First Name of Authorized Representative correctly stated
  • Employer’s Business or Organization Name correctly stated
  • Address of business correctly stated – No PO boxes allowed

Step Four: Auditing Section Three of the I-9 Form

When conducting your internal audit, Section Three of the I-9 form deals with reverification which only applies if evidence of employment authorization (List A or List C document) presented in Section two expires. Step four also covers what to do if you’re missing any I-9 forms.

  • Do not reverify: US Citizens and Noncitizen Nationals, or Lawful Permanent
  • Residents (I-551)
  • If employee listed an expiration date in Section 1, employment eligibility
  • reverified on or before expiration date
  • Date of rehire, if applicable (mm/dd/yyyy)
  • New name listed, if applicable
  • Document title correctly stated
  • Document number correctly stated
  • Employment authorization document expiration date (mm/dd/yyyy)
  • Signature of Authorized Representative present and correctly placed
  • Date of company certification (mm/dd/yyyy)
  • Printed name of Authorized Representative

Missing Forms I-9

For current employees – require employee to present documentation and complete a new Form I-9 with current dates. Date of hire will be the employee’s actual date of hire, which may have been years earlier. Attach a memo to the Form I-9 explaining the discrepancy between the date of hire and the date of completion of the Form I-9. Sign and date the memo.

For former employees – date and attach a memo to Forms I-9 for any terminated employees with missing or incorrect Form I-9 information. Retain it with other Forms I-9. Documenting this demonstrates an employer’s good faith effort to correct the forms by performing an internal self-audit.

Step Five: Addressing Form I-9 with Errors

Errors are bound to happen. Especially when you’re dealing with I-9 forms. But here’s what you do to ensure you keep on trucking!

Easily correctable – you may do so on the form. The best way to correct the Form I-9 is to line through the portions of the form that contain incorrect information (preferably in a contrasting ink color), then enter the correct information. Initial and date your correction. Never use white correction fluid. If you have previously made changes on Forms I-9 using white correction fluid instead, USCIS recommends that you attach a note to the corrected Forms I-9 explaining what happened. Be sure to sign and date the note.

Not easily correctable – complete a new Form I-9.

The old Form I-9 is attached to the new one, along with a note explaining the reason for creating a new Form I-9. Do not throw away the old form.

Step Six: Administrative Wrap Up

You’ve just completed conducting your internal I-9 Form! But you’re not completely done, yet. There are still a few administrative things you’ll need to wrap up.

Photocopies of List 2 documents – if they exist, are attached to the Form I-9 and are readable. It is not mandatory to make photocopies (except in Colorado), but if they are made, they must be kept. If photocopies are made for one employee, they must be made for all employees.

Employers enrolled in E-Verify must keep copies of the following documents if they are presented by the employee – US Passport or Passport Card, Permanent Resident Card (I-551), or Employment Authorization Card (I-766).

Manual Audit Log – The list of the Forms I-9 containing errors is completed. (This is the audit log that shows you have made a good faith effort to ensure Form I-9 compliance. The log should contain three columns: employee’s name, the errors, and the actions taken to rectify the errors.)

Why You Need To Do This, Right Now

Now you’re on your way to conducting a flawless Form I-9 internal audit. But why was this so important? Recently there has been an increase in enforcement for Form I-9 audits for employers. So what exactly changed?

On January 10, 2018, early morning reports of raids by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) confirmed what had been assumed – worksite enforcement has been increased and employers need to take note. The continued reports of high-profile ICE raids are definitely intentional. ICE wants employers to know that they’ve increased enforcement and they want you to take this very seriously. The current administration also appears to be building upon successful tactics that were used during both the Bush and Obama eras by focusing on administrative arrests of employees and requests for Forms I-9 through a Notice of Inspection (NOI) to employers. ICE conducted 1,279 audits of I-9 forms in 2016 and that number is expected to rise dramatically under the new enforcement focus.

Sure this can be scary, but knowing how to conduct your own internal I-9 form audits can help. And the word to remember for this process is “thorough.” An internal audit should include an in-depth review of all of an organization’s Forms I-9. Considering the limited resources and time of an organization, a comprehensive review of all I-9 records may not be feasible. In this case, organizations are encouraged to review a significant and fair sample of Forms I-9 to determine where the majority of errors/omissions occur, how to correct these, and how to implement better training and policies to ensure proper completion and compliance moving forward. For more information on self-auditing guidelines see the Department of Justice publication: Guidance for Employers Conducting Internal Employment Eligibility Verification Form I-9 Audits.

Let AZ HR Hub know how we can help your company.

2018 Compensation and Benefits Workshop

We are excited to host a half day workshop on October 3rd at Because Space for Life.

When employees feel satisfied and valued in their roles, they’ll be more engaged and motivated to work harder and deliver top results.

At the 2018 Comp & Benefits Workshop, HR thought leaders and experts will touch on aspects of Total Rewards – from compensation, to work-life effectiveness and benefits, including pay equity and paid time off. You’ll walk away with practical tips and new strategies to ultimately create breakthrough performance throughout your company.

Agenda

 7:30 – 8:15am Continental Breakfast, Registration, Network, Meet Vendors
 8:15 – 8:30am Welcome message
 8:30 – 10:00am How to Become a Compensation Nerd

 

Does compensation mystify you?  Well, you’re not alone.  Join your fellow generalists on a journey to understand compensation basics and some strategic approaches to forming your company’s pay practices. In this workshop you will learn:

·       The eight questions to answer before you start solving your compensation issues.

·       How to think about and use survey data

·       How to structure your base pay into grades and ranges

10:00 – 10:15am Break with Vendors
10:15 – 11:45am Winning at Total Rewards: How to HIGH FIVE your Total Rewards program!

 

A 90-minute tour of the FIVE Total Rewards components that will make your TR program successful.  In this workshop you will learn:

·       Review the foundation of Total Rewards and the FIVE key components that make up a great TR program

·       For each of the FIVE key components, a quick look at best practices and how to set up that part of your TR plan if you don’t already have it

·       Resources to help assist in the setup and maintenance of the FIVE key components

11:45 – 12:00pm Wrap Up, Raffle Prizes


Why Attend?

  • Evaluate your organization’s existing total rewards strategy using current trend information.
  • Discover new strategies to build a “Best Place to Work” culture that attracts and retains the best and brightest talent.
  • Determine how to influence your organization’s success by learning real-world and practical solutions to your top business and HR challenges.
  • Understand why engaging employees is the path to profitability and business growth and how to use employee engagement as the ultimate competitive advantage.
  • Develop an impactful total rewards strategy with help from peer insights and analytics and learn how to communicate your offerings, so employees understand the value.
  • Network with more than 150 HR professionals who are responsible for compensation and benefits plans and strategies.

 Meet Our Speakers

Gail Paul is the CEO of StrategiComp.  She has over 25 years of experience as both consultant and practitioner in the areas of compensation, executive compensation and benefits.

StrategiComp, formed in 2016, has many diverse publicly and privately funded clients from multiple industries.

Gail’s background includes serving as the top Total Rewards executive for publicly traded organizations Universal Technical Institute and Del Webb Corporation (Pulte Homes), where she was responsible for managing executive compensation programs, pay and incentive structures, equity incentive plans, and creating and communicating the compensation philosophy and strategies.

Gail has also worked as a Senior Consultant at Mercer H.R. Consulting / Mercer Health & Benefits, providing comprehensive HR and benefits consultation to large corporate and government clients in Arizona and Nevada. She was the founder and principle of Matrix Compensation & Benefits Consulting, where she crafted powerful compensation and total rewards strategies for a wide variety of clients, public, private, Fortune 500 and small firms.

Gail is a Certified Executive Compensation Professional through WorldatWork and is an active member.  In addition, Gail is a Predictive Index Certified Partner through MindWire Group where she serves as Vice President/Partner.

 

Sheila Krueger is a Total Rewards Expert with Televerde. Sheila M Krueger is what is referred to as a “seasoned” professional. Not only is she tender and juicy, she’s got over 20 years of practical and strategic experience in the Total Rewards arena. Starting with a stint selecting and installing an HRIS system (when she didn’t even know what HRIS stood for), to overseeing Total Rewards programs for companies of 200, 750, and 3500 employees, Sheila has heard all the stories and survived to tell the tales.

 

Meet Our Vendors

Edward Jones – Carina Burtell

HRCI Credits Pending

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Why should you improve your employee onboarding program?

Employee onboarding is a very method used in talent acquisition.
If done right, employee onboarding process can easily become your secret weapon for hiring and retaining talent.

A successful employee onboarding program ensures that your best candidate actually shows up on their first day at the new job.

This is because a successful employee onboarding process starts at the moment your best candidate accepts your offer.
If you don’t engage you best candidates until their start date, they might accept a better offer or a counteroffer from their current employer.

It also helps to improve retention, engagement, satisfaction, and productivity of your new employees.

According to the Society For Human Resources Management (SHRM):

  • 69% of employees are more likely to stay with a company for three years if they experienced great onboarding.
  • Organizations with a standard onboarding process experience 50% greater new-hire productivity.
  • 54% of companies with onboarding programs reported higher employee engagement.

3 best employee onboarding tips

Here are the best 3 tips that will help get the most out of your onboarding program:

Tip #1: Plan and organize 

If you want to maximize the power of your onboarding process, you need to carefully structure it. To learn how, check out our step-by-step Guide on how to successfully onboard new employees.

Keep in mind that:

  1. A successful onboarding is a process
    A successful employee onboarding is not an event that takes place on your new employee’s first day at the office. It is a continuous process that starts at the moment your best candidate accepts your job offer.
  2. A successful onboarding is people oriented
    A successful employee onboarding is not focused on tasks, but on people.
    The human touch drives onboarding success.  The secret of great onboarding is the fact that it makes your new employees feel welcomed and integrated into your company culture from the day one!

Tip #2: Automate 

Automating your employee onboarding process will help you save time and your nerves. There are many different employee onboarding tools you can use to easily automate your onboarding process.

There are 3 main types of employee onboarding tools:

  1. Checklists: Checklists are the most simple and straightforward tool that can help you onboard new employees.
  2. Specialized tools: Specialized employee onboarding tools are tools created for the sole purpose of improving the employee onboarding process.
  3. Integrated tools: Integrated tools are comprehensive, all-in-one tools that offer solutions for your whole HR management process, including payroll, benefits, time and attendance, etc.

Tip#3: Be creative 

To make your new employees’ onboarding experience truly unique, you need to get creative! Luckily for you, we compiled the best and the most innovative employee onboarding ideas and examples from experts to inspire you!

Here are 3 simple, but creative employee onboarding ideas you can easily implement:

  1. Welcome GIF or video: Gather your team and create a welcome video for your new employee!
    If your employees shy away from a camera or you don’t have enough time on your hands, go with the quicker version – create a welcome GIF!
  2. Decorate your new employee’s desk: Decorate your new employee’s desk with some balloons, welcome sign and maybe even some cake! You can also pack your company swag (such as branded notebook, pens, T-shirt, water bottle, etc.) as a present!
  3. 100th-day party: Throwing a 100 day on the job party for your employees is a great opportunity to shower them with some attention and remind them how much you are happy to have them joined your company.

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